Tarmac Delay Policy

Revised: May 06, 2015

Island Air will permit passengers to disembark an aircraft on the tarmac before it is delayed more than three (3) hours after the aircraft door closes (in the case of departure) or from the time the aircraft touches down (in the case of arrival) unless:

(i) The pilot-in-command determines there is a safety-related or security-related reason why the aircraft cannot leave its position on the tarmac to deplane passengers

Or

(ii) Air Traffic Control advises the pilot-in-command that returning to the gate or another disembarking point elsewhere in order to deplane passengers would significantly disrupt airport operations.

If extended delays over two (2) hours are encountered for passengers onboard an aircraft on the tarmac after the aircraft leaves the gate (in case of departure) or touches down (in case of arrival), Island Air will provide food (snack mix, pretzels, granola bars, or similar) and beverage (water or juice), unless the pilot-in-command determines that safety or security requirements preclude such service.

While the aircraft remains on the tarmac, Island Air will provide accessible lavatory facilities and access to medical treatment from the airport emergency medical response team to permit boarding of the aircraft or deplaning of the passenger requiring attention.

Contingency Plan for Lengthy Tarmac Delays

Overview

Island Air has adopted this Contingency Plan for Lengthy Tarmac Delays (the “Plan”) in accordance with 49 U.S.C. § 42301 and 14 C.F.R. § 259.4. This Plan applies to Island Air’s scheduled and public charter flights at each U.S. large hub airport, medium hub airport, small hub airport and non-hub airport at which Island Air operates or markets such air service. As used in this Plan, the term “tarmac delay” means the holding of an aircraft on the ground either before taking off or after landing with no opportunity for its passengers to deplane. Before tarmac delays occur, Island Air has a comprehensive plan designed to forecast and adjust to operational challenges and minimize lengthy delays while passengers are on board the aircraft. Systems Operations Center at Island Air’s Honolulu terminal is responsible for the daily execution of this Plan, while keeping in mind the safety and well-being of our customers. The Department of Transportation (DOT) tarmac delay rule establishes requirements in the event of a tarmac delay, including hard time limits. This Plan meets or exceeds the DOT requirements.

Plan Requirements

  • Island Air will not permit an aircraft to remain on the tarmac for more than three (3) hours before allowing passengers an opportunity to deplane unless the Pilot In Command (PIC) determines there is a safety or security related reason why the aircraft cannot leave its position on the tarmac to deplane passengers or Air Traffic Control (ATC) advises that returning to a gate or other disembarkation point would significantly disrupt airport operations.
  • Island Air will provide adequate food (snack mix, pretzels, granola bars, or similar items) and beverages (water or juice) no later than two (2) hours after the aircraft leaves the gate (in the case of departures) or touches down (in the case of arrivals) if the aircraft remains on the tarmac, unless the PIC determines that safety or security considerations preclude such service
  • Island Air will provide operable lavatory facilities and other customer comfort needs while the aircraft remains on the tarmac.  Island Air also will ensure adequate medical attention is available, if needed, while an aircraft remains on the tarmac.
  • Island Air will maintain aircraft cabin temperatures at a comfortable level during a tarmac delay.
  • Island Air will provide passengers on a delayed flight with notifications regarding the status of delay every 30 minutes while the aircraft is delayed, along with information concerning the cause of the tarmac delay, if known.
  • Island Air will provide passengers on a delayed flight with notifications beginning no later than 30 minutes after scheduled departure time (including any revised departure time that passengers were notified of before boarding) and every 30 minutes thereafter that they have the opportunity to deplane from the aircraft if the aircraft is at a gate or another disembarkation area with the door open if the opportunity to deplane actually exists.
  • Island Air has committed sufficient resources to implement this Plan.
  • Island Air has coordinated this plan with local airport authorities (including terminal facility operators where applicable) and TSA representatives at each U.S. large hub airport, medium hub airport, small hub airport and non-hub airport the carrier serves, including diversion airports.
  • Island Air will share airport facilities, and coordinate with local airport authorities and other governmental representatives to make airport gates available for use, during emergencies. Island Air also will work with such entities to ensure back-up methods for inoperative equipment and the provisioning and servicing of aircraft during tarmac delays.

Responsibility

Systems Operations Center is responsible for the management and quality of this Plan. The decision-making for this Plan lies within Systems Operations Center. Stations, Flight Operations and In-Flight Service will carry out the Plan at the station and flight level.

Station Plan

This Plan builds upon the standard operating procedures now in place to handle extended on-board delays and diversions. All stations have identified resources and developed procedures that will allow them to effectively bring a plane off the runway and open the door, giving the passengers the opportunity to egress within specified time limits.

Stations will assure that diversions are given the same priority as other taxi delays, meaning passenger egress will be allowed prior to the three (3) hour mark, subject to the safety and security or ATC related exceptions identified above. Individual station plans allow at least 30 minutes to complete the task of returning to the gate or another disembarkation point and deplaning.

Communication

Throughout a tarmac delay, communication between Island Air’s Systems Operations Center and the flight crew will be continual. Both Systems Operations Center and flight crew will monitor the general environment and “mood” of the customers at all times. Island Air will make decisions for the well-being of all customers aboard the affected flight.